Reflection

For this year’s Professional Practice module, we had to research different approaches to applying for jobs, writing a CV and a cover letter tailored to the ideal position we would like to get hired for, and put together a showreel.

The part I struggled with the most was deciding which would be my perfect job. I can easily and happily see myself learning to work in almost any position within the industry, as I am aware of the reality of those jobs. That being said, I have always had huge respect and admiration for gaming artists. The more I learn from this course, the more appreciative I feel towards their skill and ability to deal with pressure. Their audience is far more different than for example, movie audiences. The people that play video games take an active role in whatever world they are provided with, leading to them feeling cheated when games fail to deliver the immersion that they implicitly promise. The whole experience is an extremely personal one, so the video game artist, just as the rest of the developing team, has the immense responsibility of making it a good one.

What appeals to me most about the gaming industry is the community and the sense of fulfilment you experience as an artist for having created worlds and environments that empower your customers on a personal level. For years, the company I considered ideal to work for has been CCP. I have been keeping track of their progress and even with the latest round of dropped projects and cutbacks, there isn’t a bad comment or review of their community in sight. Working for them would also involve relocating to London or possibly Reykjavik, which isn’t really an issue for me since I adapt easily to life in different cultures.

On the other hand, I keep up to date with the opportunities available in Ireland and Northern Ireland because I believe there are numerous companies that provide amazing career paths. I stay informed through websites such as Glassdoor, Reddit, NI Screen, attend every 2D 3D meeting and any industry talks I hear of. I found the meetings in Hudson bar to be very helpful as the people that join are always up for chatting about their work. More often than not they really do enjoy what they do and can give valuable insight into what their jobs entail. It is with the help of current and former students that usually attend those meetings that I was able to understand the requirements of successfully applying for jobs not only in Northern Ireland but in other countries as well.

The Animation Industry talks on Friday, 8th of December were highly informative. The segments that interested me the most were presented by Prof. Greg Maguire, William Bar and Richard Williams. I was aware of Prof. Maguire’s company called Humain but never actually had the chance to talk to him about it so listening to him describe their projects was a bit of a revelation. That being said, all the projects presented on the 8th were interesting in their own way as they had different subject matters, all very relevant to our field.

I believe this module was greatly successful in teaching us how to prioritise our time and build towards a career in animation. All the guest speakers gave us good insight into the Belfast job market and more specifically, the various positions within our field.

 

ArtStation. (2017). Andrei Cristea. [online] Available at: https://www.artstation.com/undoz [Accessed 18 Dec. 2017].

Ccpgames.com. (2017). Contact us – CCP Games. [online] Available at: https://www.ccpgames.com/contact-us [Accessed 20 Dec. 2017].

Iadt.edu. (2017). Targeting Your Audience: 3 Important Tips for Designing Games. [online] Available at: http://www.iadt.edu/student-life/iadt-buzz/may-2013/tips-for-designing-games-audience [Accessed 20 Dec. 2017].

Jakobb Dee’s Digital Portfolio. (2017). Multimedia Artists and Animator. [online] Available at: https://jakobbdee.weebly.com/multimedia-artists-and-animator.html [Accessed 18 Dec. 2017].

Jayanth, M. (2017). 52% of gamers are women – but the industry doesn’t know it | Meg Jayanth. [online] the Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/sep/18/52-percent-people-playing-games-women-industry-doesnt-know [Accessed 18 Dec. 2017].

Mary Stewart. (2017). MU/DAI. [online] Available at: http://mary-stewart.com/mudaidesign [Accessed 18 Dec. 2017].

reddit. (2017). Ireland Jobs • r/IreJobs. [online] Available at: https://www.reddit.com/r/IreJobs/ [Accessed 18 Dec. 2017].

Sageng, J. and Fossheim, H. (n.d.). The Philosophy of Computer Games. [ebook] Available at: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=q_AVJXKbE4wC&pg=PA208&lpg=PA208&dq=what+distinguishes+gaming+audience+from+other+audience&source=bl&ots=pRt5QzE9r4&sig=aTa05e9bVDyY47s4riFUPYc4U3I&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwja1q2Uu5nYAhVqIsAKHa3SAYgQ6AEIRTAG#v=onepage&q=what%20distinguishes%20gaming%20audience%20from%20other%20audience&f=false [Accessed 20 Dec. 2017].

Wilson Center. (2017). Understanding Gaming Audiences. [online] Available at: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/blog-post/understanding-gaming-audiences [Accessed 18 Dec. 2017].

 

 

 

 

 

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Showreel

UPDATE:

Updated showreel post feedback

 

Previous showreel below:

 

Inspiration:

JAKE MATHEW – MOTION GRAPHIC DESIGNER. (2017). MOTION. [online] Available at: http://www.jakemathew.com/ [Accessed 21 Dec. 2017].

Vimeo. (2017). Character Animation Showreel 2017. [online] Available at: https://vimeo.com/133076965 [Accessed 21 Dec. 2017].

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